Buy Serval [Female – 14 weeks old – Not Neutered] Cindy

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Buy Serval [Female – 14 weeks old – Not Neutered] Cindy

$2,000.00

Name Cindy
Gender Female
Age 14 weeks old
Neutered No
Papers

License Permit, Health  Certificate, Insurance Certificate, Shipping Permit

Vaccines given Rabies, Leukemia, Feline herpes virus
Microchipped Yes
Stud No
Temperament  Playful, Cuddly
Litter trained  Yes

Cindy is a 14 weeks old Serval kitten available for sale. She has been litter trained and one of the smartest as far as communication is concerned. We always try to train our Servals at an early stage so they grow with a beautiful loving mindset. She loves to cuddle, especially when bathing her. She loves to play with other pets, she’s fearless. Adopt now

AVAILABLE

Description

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Name Cindy
Gender Female
Age 14 weeks old
Neutered No
Papers

License Permit, Health  Certificate, Insurance Certificate, Shipping Permit

Vaccines given Rabies, Leukemia, Feline herpes virus
Microchipped Yes
Stud Yes
Temperament  Playful, Cuddly
Litter trained  Yes

Cindy is a 14 weeks old Serval kitten available for sale. She has been litter trained and one of the smartest as far as communication is concerned. We always try to train our Servals at an early stage so they grow with a beautiful loving mindset. She loves to cuddle, especially when bathing her. She loves to play with other pets, she’s fearless. Adopt now

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Living With Servals

Serval and Savannah cats are very playful, so you need to understand they need space (Be it indoor or outdoor). Serval kittens are relatively average sized cats compared to Tigers and Cheetahs, but they are the biggest domestic breeds as far as domestic cats are concerned. Servals still need space to climb and play around. They are trained to adapt to indoor and outdoor habitation. Unlike other cats, African Serval cats can’t run away from home, if they leave their enclosed area, they are most likely to return. But this means they will need to adapt to their environment or else they will be hard to capture if they are let to walk free or escape when they are not used to their new habitation. While they are relatively harmless to humans, once free, they are very difficult to capture because they are fast and easily detect hostile activity (especially if they just recently move in to the environment). Read more about Serval & Savannah kittens

Serval Diet

African Serval cats and Savannah cats are carnivorous and the best diet for them is a whole prey such chicken, rats, fish and other commercial provision foods such as Mazurim Zupreme and other healthy protein supplements which will be listed on the food menu which the kitten comes with. Serval and Savannah kittens grow larger than most domestic cats, so they require health foods with protein in other for them to grow properly. Purchase a Serval or Savannah

Servals & Savannah cats vary in characteristics based on how you live with them. Generally, Serval and Savannah cats are lovely and playful pets, most especially with children. We have kids and so far, I’ve never had a case of violence from my cats. They are too playful and active and some might mistake it for aggression. Growing with these cats, they are just like every domestic cat. Servals in the wild might show signs of aggression because they are in the wild lands. These kittens grow to be loving and loyal pets. Read more about Serval & Savannah kittens

They know the difference between humans and prey, and humans are definitely not a threat to them in any way. We usually advice those who own Serval cats to be available for them most times or have family relatives who are there, especially kids because they love hanging around people and their owners, else they get bored and start to feel uncomfortable and isolated. Having lots of toys for your Serval/Savannah also plays great role in keeping them company. If you are a workaholic, you need to make sure the cat has all he or she needs to keep it company in your absence. They are the most playful cats as far as domestic cats are concerned, and they are extremely flexible and smart too.

What are the serval kittens like in the wild? Interesting facts about Servals

A female Serval gives birth after 70 days. Serval kittens born in litters of two to four are difficult to spot as the mother hides them well and frequently changes the hiding place. The mother raises the litter alone and she must hunt frequently to feed them. When the Serval kittens are young enough to hunt the mother drives the male offspring out. Young females remain somewhat longer but when they are sexually mature they too leave to establish their own territories. Read more about Serval & Savannah kittens

What other safari animals are commonly mistaken for Servals?

Cheetahs have similar markings but are much bigger and have smaller ears.

Civets are from the mongoose family, darker markings and smaller ears.

Genets have much smaller ears.

Caracals have fine ear tufts and uniform colouring. Read more about Serval & Savannah kittens

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Serval reproduction. Serval behavior during mating

Both sexes become sexually mature when they are one to two years old. Oestrus in females lasts one to four days; it typically occurs once or twice a year, though it can occur three or four times a year if the mother loses her litters.[38] Observations of captive servals suggest that when a female enters oestrus, the rate of urine-marking increases in her as well as the males in her vicinity. In most cases, the female will roam restlessly, spray urine frequently holding her vibrating tail in a vertical manner, rub her head near the place she has marked, salivate continuously, give out sharp and short “miaow”s that can be heard for quite a distance, and rub her mouth and cheeks against the face of an approaching male.

Gestation lasts for two to three months, following which a litter of one to four kittens is born. Blind at birth, newborn weigh nearly 250 g (9 oz) and have soft, woolly hair (greyer than in adults) and unclear markings. The eyes open after nine to thirteen days. Weaning begins a month after birth; the mother brings small kills to her kittens and calls out to them as she approaches the “den”. A mother with young kittens rests for a notably lesser time and has to spend almost twice the time and energy for hunting than do other servals. If disturbed, the mother shifts her kittens one by one to a more secure place. Kittens eventually start accompanying their mother to hunts. At around six months, they acquire their permanent canines and begin to hunt themselves; they leave their mother at about 12 months of age. They may reach sexual maturity from 12 to 25 months of age. Life expectancy is about 10 years in the wild, and up to 20 years in captivity.

Serval ancient history

21st-century pet owners aren’t the first to be hypnotised by the serval. These beautiful cats have been traded since the time of Tutankhamun.

Roll back 2500 years and servals were exotic gifts in Ancient Egypt. They were poached in sub-Saharan Africa and taken across Sudan, where they were idolised by Egyptian rulers and landowners.

The cat was later traded with Europe. It became the symbol of a distinguished Sicilian family and the Italian island of Lampedusa.

This slender cat can be easily mistaken. When seen from a distance it can be mistaken for a baby leopard, due to its spotted fur and lean frame.

Look specifically at the legs. Servals have the longest legs (proportionally) of all Africa’s cats, whereas leopards have shorter legs and a much longer tail. In comparison a serval’s black-tipped tail is just 30-40 cm long.

They can measure up to 70 cm and can weigh up to 18 kg. Most of these cats are in the 10-15 kg range. This is larger than the African wildcat, a species that doesn’t have the same spotted fur.

Above a serval’s small head is a protruding pair of ears. These are evidently oversized and provide the keen sense of hearing.

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How fast is a serval?

Servals reach an incredible top speed of 80 km/h (50 mph). This is as fast as a lion and faster than a leopard. Like the cheetah, these cats have very long legs and strides, helping them to reach this top speed.

What sounds does a serval make?

These sublime hunters make a wide variation of sounds but are mostly silent. Most distinguishable is the low-pitched purr, a sound similar to that of a cheetah cub.

Servals & Human Bonding

Serval cats can bond with humans, especially if they are bottle-raised and hand-fed. Typically, they are a one-human cat and bond for life. You will need to spend time with the cat, playing on its level, eye-to-eye. They can be affectionate but require patience and a gentle hand in training. While you can try to socialize a serval, they will often remain shy of strangers and can be frightened by visitors.

These cats are usually shy during the day and more active at night. Servals can be very active in play and if you bring a serval into the house, it should be in a serval-proofed cat room that doesn’t have breakable objects, wires, or other hazards.

While servals can be litter-trained, be aware that urinating on objects is part of their natural way of marking their territory. For safety when walking your serval, you will need a special serval harness since they are not built like domestic cats.

You will need to have a plan in place for someone to care for your serval cat if you take a vacation, need a break, or develop your own health problems.

Common Health Concerns For Serval & Savannah Cats

Ensure access to a veterinarian who can care for exotic pets. Servals need the same annual immunizations and dewormings as domestic cats.

While many pet servals are declawed in the interest of preventing injury to humans, this is a practice that can result in an infection. It also makes the serval vulnerable in a confrontation with other animals. One common veterinary emergency for servals is swallowing foreign objects, which can become lodged in their throats or difficult to pass.

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